- Geyserworld -
Alan Glennon, Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara


Geyser Wire
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CNN

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Girl gored by bison in Yellowstone Park while posing for a picture
CNN
The 16-year-old exchange student, whose name wasn't provided by the park service, was visiting Yellowstone with her host family. As they were hiking near the geyser Old Faithful, they stopped where a group of people had gathered to watch a bison ...
Teen Gored Posing for Photo Next to Bison at Yellowstone National ParkABC News
Taiwanese student gored by bison in Yellowstone National ParkReuters
16-year-old Yellowstone National Park visitor injured in bison encounterKRTV Great Falls News
KTVQ Billings News -moviepilot.com -The Inquisitr
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OregonLive.com

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Headed to Yellowstone? Be wary of bears, but also bison, scalding water ...
OregonLive.com
In the park's history, only 20 visitors have died from being boiled by one of Yellowstone's geysers or similar features. Park officials say falling into the park's Grand Canyon is uncommon, but does happen. An 8-year-old girl died there in August when ...
Yellowstone Injuries: Slips, Falls Outpace Bear MaulingsBoise State Public Radio

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Billings Gazette

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10 must-have Yellowstone experiences
Billings Gazette
What is the geyser kiss? You'll find that the boardwalks in Yellowstone are located very close to some of the smaller geysers, where this effect is most likely to happen. When these geysers erupt, and when the wind (even a slight breeze) is pointed ...

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High Country News

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Battle of the Lands: Readers Vote
High Country News
Spectacular hiking and backpacking, blue ribbon fly-fishing, wolf-watching and geyser-gazing: Yellowstone's got it all. (Cue the kayakers saying, “Wait a minute…) The surreal volcanic sweep of Craters of the Moon may not be the most traditionally ...

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Celebrating Clean Water for America's National Parks
Huffington Post
Whether they are snorkeling at Virgin Islands National Park, fishing at Glacier National Park, or geyser-viewing at Yellowstone National Park -- national park visitors consistently rank water quality or water access as one of the top five most valued ...

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The Spokesman Review (blog)

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Paddling Yellowstone Rivers bill a sham from a scourge
The Spokesman Review (blog)
Cynthia Lummis's proposals to force the Park Service to organize programs that would allow canoes, kayaks and rafts on more Yellowstone waters? Firmly against -- for more reasons than one. Check out this commentary by Todd Wilkinson in the Jackson ...

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Perth Now

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Winter wonders of Yellowstone NP
Perth Now
Yellowstone, which is primarily in Wyoming, has the highest concentration of geothermal features in the world, including mud pots, geysers, hot springs and steam vents (called fumaroles). .... Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming.
Share this storyHerald Sun
Bears Chase Away Tourists From Yellowstone: VideoStudent Operated Press

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Greg Peck: Is a national park on your vacation list?
Gazettextra
This year, our targets are Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks. Yellowstone is our nation's oldest national park. I saw it just after graduating from high school, but I was too sick to appreciate it. The park has plenty of geysers and lots of ...

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NBC Montana

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Mapping beneath Yellowstone shows huge magma system
NBC Montana
The reason Yellowstone has the most and largest geysers, pools and other thermals on earth is because of a mammoth magma system underneath it, which also fueled several huge volcanic eruptions over millions of years. "This is the one big continental ...


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'Sidesaddle, geyser' trips talk Wednesday
Cody Enterprise
Miller will present Sidesaddles and Geysers: Women's Adventures in Early Yellowstone during the Buffalo Gals Luncheon at the Buffalo Bill Center of the West in Cody on Wednesday, May 20, 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m. For tickets and details, call 578-4008.

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What are geysers and why are they so rare?
Last update: 9 August 2008

A geyser is a hot spring that periodically erupts, throwing water into the air. Though that sounds simple, geysers are extremely rare. As of August 2008, the total of active geysers on earth numbered approximately 1000.

Pink Cone Geyser, Yellowstone, photo by Alan Glennon Conditions must be just right for geysers to occur. Three components must be present for geysers to exist: an abundant supply of water, an intense source of heat, and unique plumbing. Water is common in nature, heat can come from volcanic activity, but the plumbing is critical. For water to be thrown into the air, geyser plumbing must be water- and pressure-tight. Geyser scientists and observers have identified the volcanic rock rhyolite as being particularly effective at hosting geysers. Rhyolite is high in silica, which can deposit a water-tight seal along the walls of the geyser plumbing. Most of the geyser fields in the world are found in rhyolite or similar silica-laden rocks (like ignimbrite). The mixture of water, volcanic heat, and plumbing is exceptional at Yellowstone National Park. Over one-half of the world's geysers are located within the park's boundaries.

It is increasingly apparent that geysers must possess a fourth characteristic to exist: remoteness. Within the last fifty years, volcanic heat and abundant water have been increasingly harnessed to turn turbines for electricity production. Geothermal energy can be produced at any site where volcanic heat and water are readily available. Unfortunately, geyser fields are ideal for this type of energy production. Geothermal energy production steals the geysers' water, and destroys geyser activity (for example, Wairakei, New Zealand). A growing threat to geysers stems from mineral extraction. Hot groundwater may precipitate gold or other valuable minerals, and extraction may require removing the geyser plumbing itself. For example, in May 2003, mineral exploration at South Americas second largest geyser field (Puchuldiza, Chile), caused cessation in the fields geysers. Few realize the actual rarity of geysers. As a result, many geyser fields have been destroyed and many others are being threatened.

How do geysers work?

The following is an excerpt from Scott Bryan's GEYSERS OF YELLOWSTONE, 3rd edition, copyright 2001. It is reproduced here for educational purposes. Scott Bryan's book not only describes each Yellowstone geyser in detail, but also includes descriptions of geyser fields worldwide. It is probably the best book on geysers out there. Buy it or check it out!

The hot water, circulating up from great depth, flows into the plumbing system of a geyser. Because this water is many degrees above the boiling point, some of it turns to steam instead of forming liquid pools. Meanwhile, additional, cooler water is flowing into the geyser from the porous rocks nearer the surface. The two waters mix as the plumbing system fills.

Morning Glory Pool, Yellowstone National Park, Photo by Alan Glennon The steam bubbles formed at depth rise and meet the cooler water. At first, they condense there, but as they do they gradually heat the water. Eventually, these steam bubbles rising from deep within the plumbing system manage to heat the surface water until it also reaches the boiling point. Now the geyser begins to function like a pressure cooker. The water within the plumbing system is hotter than boiling, but "stable" because of the pressure exerted by all the water lying above it. (Remember that the boiling point of a liquid is dependent upon the pressure. The boiling point of pure water 212 degrees Farenheit (100 degrees Celsius) at sea level. In Yellowstone the elevation is about 7,500 feet, the pressure is lower, and the boiling point of water is only about 199 degrees Farenheit (93 degrees Celsius).

The filling and heating process continues until the geyser is full or nearly full of water. A very small geyser may take but a few seconds to fill whereas some of the larger geysers take several days. Once the plumbing system is full the geyser is about ready for an eruption. Often forgotten but of extreme importance is the heating that must occur along with the filling. Only if there is an adequate store of heat within the rocks lining the plumbing system can an eruption last for more than a few seconds. Again, each geyser is different from every other. Some are hot enough to erupt before they are completely full and do so without any preliminary indications of an eruption. Others may be completely full well before they are hot enough to erupt and so may overflow quietly for some time before an eruption occurs. But, eventually, the eruption will take place.

Because the water of the entire plumbing system has been heated to boiling, the rising steam bubbles no longer collapse near the surface. Instead, as more very hot water enters the geyser at great depth, even more and larger steam bubbles form and rise toward the surface. At first, they are able to make it all the way to the top of the plumbing system. But a time will come when there are so many steam bubbles that they can no longer simply float upwards. Somewhere they encounter some sort of constriction or bend in the plumbing. To get by they must squirt through the narrow spot. This forces some water ahead of them and up and out of the geyser. This initial loss of water reduces the pressure at depth, lowering the boiling point of water already hot enough to boil. More water boils, forming more steam. Soon there is a virtual explosion as the steam expands to over 1,500 times its original, liquid volume. The boiling rapidly becomes violent and water is ejected so rapidly that it is thrown into the air.

The eruption will continue until either the water is used up or the temperature drops below boiling. Once an eruption has ended. the entire process of filling, heating, and boiling will be repeated, leading to another eruption.

Old Faithful Geyser, Yellowstone - Alan Glennon 2004

In Depth


To reference this page, use the appropriate variation of the following format:

J. Alan Glennon. (2008) About Geysers, http://www.geyserworld.com, University of California, Santa Barbara, originally posted January 1995, updated August 9, 2008.

T. Scott Bryan (2001) The Geysers of Yellowstone, 3rd edition, University Press of Colorado: Boulder, pp.472.


For more information, contact:
J. Alan Glennon
Department of Geography
University of California
Santa Barbara, California 93106

e-mail: glennon(at)umail.ucsb.edu