- Geyserworld -
Alan Glennon, Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara


Geyser Wire
Updates from Google News

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Yellowstone Insider

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Yellowstone Norris Geyser Basin: After Activity, All is Quiet
Yellowstone Insider
One nugget to come out of a conference on the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem last week: movement of the Yellowstone Norris Geyser Basin had been measured by sensors to be moving southeast and upward, but the activity ceased after an April 2014 ...
Ground sensors at Norris Geyser Basin movementGreat Falls Tribune
Yellowstone caldera moves more, but there's no dangerCasper Star-Tribune Online
Yellowstone Caldera Moves More, But No DangerInsurance Journal

all 23 news articles »
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Yellowstone Insider

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Astrophoto: Old Faithful Geyser Erupts Under a Starry Sky
Universe Today
The Old Faithful geyser in Yellowstone National Park in the western US is one of the most predictable geographical features on Earth, as it erupts “faithfully” every 60 – 110 minutes. But you can never predict what the night sky will look like overhead ...
Final Days of the 2014 Yellowstone Summer SeasonYellowstone Insider

all 3 news articles »
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Great Falls Tribune

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Relax, Yellowstone super volcano not ready to erupt
Great Falls Tribune
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK – In the last couple years, Peter Cervelli, who monitors the Yellowstone volcano, saw a major eruption of the world's largest geyser, an uplift of the Norris Geyser Basin and the largest earthquake in the park in 30 years.

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Greenroofs.com

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Geyser Green Wall
Greenroofs.com
The Geyser building takes its inspiration from New Zealand's thermally active geography and is built on sustainable design principles. Designed for Samson Corporation in Auckland's ... The two-storied exterior green wall is a courtyard feature in this ...

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CNN

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Visiting national parks could cost more
CNN
Yellowstone is one of the few remaining intact ecosystems of significant size in the northern temperate zone on Earth, including a volcano, more than 300 geysers and more than 10,000 thermal features. Current vehicle entrance fee: $25. Arches National ...

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West Yellowstone News

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West Yellowstone set to once again be winter fun destination this season
West Yellowstone News
On December 15th, the west entrance to Yellowstone Park opens to a unique experience and adventure. Each day commercially guided snowcoach and snowmobile tours travel over snow-covered groomed roads from the west entrance at West Yellowstone, Montana ...

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CNN

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Perfect pictures: 9 of the world's best photography vacations
CNN
Giant tortoises and other wildlife on the Galapagos. Winter snowscapes and Old Faithful geyser erupting in Yellowstone. The photo ops on National Geographic-organized expeditions are reliably world-class, and so are the celebrated photographers who ...


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Geyser trustee role for local lawyer
New Zealand Herald
Local lawyer Chris Spargo has been appointed to the Geyser Community Foundation Board of Trustees. Mr Spargo said he was honoured to have been appointed and looked forward to helping Geyser build up permanent endowment funds for the long term ...


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First Yellowstone photographer also shot first images of Blackwater Canyon, Davis
Charleston Gazette
Photo courtesy U.S.Library of Congress Jackson's 1872 photograph of the Old Faithful geyser and other scenes from Wyoming's Yellowstone country were credited with accelerating the passage of legislation making Yellowstone the nation's first national park.

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Coeur d'Alene Press

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Yellowstone trip in October a great idea
Coeur d'Alene Press
Indeed. The next few days we went into the park from the town of West Yellowstone. We hiked around all the geysers and mudpots that were on our map. We saw Old Faithful erupt right on time and checked on "hot" streams that were orange, green and red, ...

What are geysers and why are they so rare?
Last update: 9 August 2008

A geyser is a hot spring that periodically erupts, throwing water into the air. Though that sounds simple, geysers are extremely rare. As of August 2008, the total of active geysers on earth numbered approximately 1000.

Pink Cone Geyser, Yellowstone, photo by Alan Glennon Conditions must be just right for geysers to occur. Three components must be present for geysers to exist: an abundant supply of water, an intense source of heat, and unique plumbing. Water is common in nature, heat can come from volcanic activity, but the plumbing is critical. For water to be thrown into the air, geyser plumbing must be water- and pressure-tight. Geyser scientists and observers have identified the volcanic rock rhyolite as being particularly effective at hosting geysers. Rhyolite is high in silica, which can deposit a water-tight seal along the walls of the geyser plumbing. Most of the geyser fields in the world are found in rhyolite or similar silica-laden rocks (like ignimbrite). The mixture of water, volcanic heat, and plumbing is exceptional at Yellowstone National Park. Over one-half of the world's geysers are located within the park's boundaries.

It is increasingly apparent that geysers must possess a fourth characteristic to exist: remoteness. Within the last fifty years, volcanic heat and abundant water have been increasingly harnessed to turn turbines for electricity production. Geothermal energy can be produced at any site where volcanic heat and water are readily available. Unfortunately, geyser fields are ideal for this type of energy production. Geothermal energy production steals the geysers' water, and destroys geyser activity (for example, Wairakei, New Zealand). A growing threat to geysers stems from mineral extraction. Hot groundwater may precipitate gold or other valuable minerals, and extraction may require removing the geyser plumbing itself. For example, in May 2003, mineral exploration at South Americas second largest geyser field (Puchuldiza, Chile), caused cessation in the fields geysers. Few realize the actual rarity of geysers. As a result, many geyser fields have been destroyed and many others are being threatened.

How do geysers work?

The following is an excerpt from Scott Bryan's GEYSERS OF YELLOWSTONE, 3rd edition, copyright 2001. It is reproduced here for educational purposes. Scott Bryan's book not only describes each Yellowstone geyser in detail, but also includes descriptions of geyser fields worldwide. It is probably the best book on geysers out there. Buy it or check it out!

The hot water, circulating up from great depth, flows into the plumbing system of a geyser. Because this water is many degrees above the boiling point, some of it turns to steam instead of forming liquid pools. Meanwhile, additional, cooler water is flowing into the geyser from the porous rocks nearer the surface. The two waters mix as the plumbing system fills.

Morning Glory Pool, Yellowstone National Park, Photo by Alan Glennon The steam bubbles formed at depth rise and meet the cooler water. At first, they condense there, but as they do they gradually heat the water. Eventually, these steam bubbles rising from deep within the plumbing system manage to heat the surface water until it also reaches the boiling point. Now the geyser begins to function like a pressure cooker. The water within the plumbing system is hotter than boiling, but "stable" because of the pressure exerted by all the water lying above it. (Remember that the boiling point of a liquid is dependent upon the pressure. The boiling point of pure water 212 degrees Farenheit (100 degrees Celsius) at sea level. In Yellowstone the elevation is about 7,500 feet, the pressure is lower, and the boiling point of water is only about 199 degrees Farenheit (93 degrees Celsius).

The filling and heating process continues until the geyser is full or nearly full of water. A very small geyser may take but a few seconds to fill whereas some of the larger geysers take several days. Once the plumbing system is full the geyser is about ready for an eruption. Often forgotten but of extreme importance is the heating that must occur along with the filling. Only if there is an adequate store of heat within the rocks lining the plumbing system can an eruption last for more than a few seconds. Again, each geyser is different from every other. Some are hot enough to erupt before they are completely full and do so without any preliminary indications of an eruption. Others may be completely full well before they are hot enough to erupt and so may overflow quietly for some time before an eruption occurs. But, eventually, the eruption will take place.

Because the water of the entire plumbing system has been heated to boiling, the rising steam bubbles no longer collapse near the surface. Instead, as more very hot water enters the geyser at great depth, even more and larger steam bubbles form and rise toward the surface. At first, they are able to make it all the way to the top of the plumbing system. But a time will come when there are so many steam bubbles that they can no longer simply float upwards. Somewhere they encounter some sort of constriction or bend in the plumbing. To get by they must squirt through the narrow spot. This forces some water ahead of them and up and out of the geyser. This initial loss of water reduces the pressure at depth, lowering the boiling point of water already hot enough to boil. More water boils, forming more steam. Soon there is a virtual explosion as the steam expands to over 1,500 times its original, liquid volume. The boiling rapidly becomes violent and water is ejected so rapidly that it is thrown into the air.

The eruption will continue until either the water is used up or the temperature drops below boiling. Once an eruption has ended. the entire process of filling, heating, and boiling will be repeated, leading to another eruption.

Old Faithful Geyser, Yellowstone - Alan Glennon 2004

In Depth


To reference this page, use the appropriate variation of the following format:

J. Alan Glennon. (2008) About Geysers, http://www.geyserworld.com, University of California, Santa Barbara, originally posted January 1995, updated August 9, 2008.

T. Scott Bryan (2001) The Geysers of Yellowstone, 3rd edition, University Press of Colorado: Boulder, pp.472.


For more information, contact:
J. Alan Glennon
Department of Geography
University of California
Santa Barbara, California 93106

e-mail: glennon(at)umail.ucsb.edu